What Does Reverse Osmosis Do to Your Water?

It seems like every time you turn your head someone is arguing about which water purification method produces the healthiest water. Since we already have health concerns about tap and bottled water, many people are looking into reverse osmosis as an alternative. But what is reverse osmosis? And just what does reverse osmosis do to your water?

If you’re anything like me, the details of any highly technical system make my eyes glaze over. The R.O. system isn’t any different. However, simply put, water is passed, under pressure, through a membrane that has a fine pore structure in order to filter out contaminants.

Now this is where it gets a little dicey. Because not all contaminants are alike when it comes to their molecular size, some make it through the membrane and others are tossed out…along with much of the water.

What does reverse osmosis do to water that contains synthetic chemicals such as pesticides and herbicides? Well, because these contaminants have small molecules they make it through the membrane and into the water. What is reverse osmosis at its most ineffective is the fact that it requires that it works in conjunction with a carbon filter in order to be able to catch these harmful contaminants.

And what does reverse osmosis do to the water that makes it through the membrane? What is reverse osmosis at its most detrimental is that the process strips the water of essential trace minerals such as magnesium, calcium and potassium. We need these minerals to be in our water. It is one of the most natural and efficient ways that nature provides for our health. Being minerally deficient means that we compromise the health of our bones and teeth.

What does reverse osmosis do to the water that gets tossed during the process? For every gallon of “clean” water that it produces, 2 to 3 gallons of water are wasted. Now it is possible to recover this wastewater but the cost usually exceeds what the average consumer can afford.

What does reverse osmosis do to your wallet? What is reverse osmosis at its most costly is that all the water used in the process costs 18 to 24 cents a gallon. These systems also require considerable upkeep.

So to summarize, you’re looking at a costly system that purifies only certain contaminants, under certain conditions while creating large amounts unusable wastewater.

Now that you know all this, what does reverse osmosis do to your opinion about which is the best water purification method? In my way of thinking, at the very least, it should inspire you to do further investigation into better alternatives. And take my word for it…they are out there.

But wait…don’t take my word for it. Do your own research. Whether it be drinking water filters or whole house filters, there are excellent water purification products available which are affordable, easy to install and maintain and provide clean, healthy water for any use in your home.

What is reverse osmosis at its best is that it’s a stepping stone for you take toward finding the best home water filtration.