Understanding the Spiritual Ramifications of Values – Nu Leadership Series

“The food that you put into your mouth doesn’t make you unclean and unfit to worship God. The bad words that come out of your mouth are what make you unclean.”
Mark 7:15-16

Why should today’s leaders be concerned with organizational values? Conflicts in values between leaders and followers can have a dramatic impact on the bottom-line of an organization. Values relate to the conscious, emotional desires that guide an individual behavior. What is the nature of values?

Joas, author of The Genesis of Values, outlines a value term called phenomenology; it is a philosophy based on the premise that reality consists of objects and events as they are perceived or understood in human consciousness.

Therefore, a case can be made of an objective existence of values. Joas grew up with a Nazi father and a Social Democratic mother in a Catholic environment. Hill, author of Laws of Success, argues that values have a significant role in a person’s success in life and notes the following human weaknesses: intolerance, greed, egotism, and jealousy.

Likewise, in Mark 7:15-16, Jesus promoted the importance of values: “The food that you put into your mouth doesn’t make you unclean and unfit to worship God. The bad words that come out of your mouth are what make you unclean.” Joas’ background influence both his value system and writings. Likewise, a leader’s environment heavily influences his decisions.

References:

Dictionary.com (n.d.). Received on August 28, 2006, from http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=phenomenology.

Gibson, J., Ivancevich, J., Donnelly, J., & Konopaske, R. (2006). Organizations: Behavior, Structure, Processes. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Hill, N. (1969). Laws of Success. Chicago, IL: Success Unlimited Edition.

Joas, H. (2000). The Genesis of Values. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Scharmer, C. (1999). Action is the way in which human beings exist in the world. Conversation with Professor Hans Joas, Freie Universitat, Berlin.

© 2006 by Daryl D. Green