Tips On Buying An Existing Business

Buying An Existing Business

In most cases, buying an existing business is less risky than starting from scratch. When you buy a business, you take over an operation that’s already generating cash flow and profits. You have an established customer base and reputation, as well as employees who are familiar with all aspects of the business. And you do not have to reinvent the wheel by setting up new procedures, systems and policies, since a successful formula for running the business has already been put in place.

On the downside, buying a business is often more costly than starting from scratch. However, it’s often easier to get financing to buy an existing business than to start a new one. Bankers and investors generally feel more comfortable dealing with a business that already has a proven track record. In addition, buying a business may give you valuable legal rights, such as patents or copyrights, which can prove very profitable.

Of course, there’s no such thing as a ‘sure thing’ and buying an existing business is no exception. If you are not careful, you could get stuck with obsolete inventory, uncooperative employees, or outdated distribution methods. To make sure you get the best deal when buying an existing business, be sure you are making the right choice.

Buying the perfect business starts with choosing the right type of business for you. The best place to start is by looking in an industry you are familiar with and understand. Think long and hard about the types of businesses you are interested in and which are the best match with your skills and experience. Also consider the size of business you are looking for, in terms of employees, number of locations and sales.

It is also very important to pinpoint the geographical area where you want to own a business. Assess the labor pool and costs of doing business in that area, including wages and taxes, to make sure they’re acceptable to you. Once you’ve chosen a region and an industry to focus on, investigate every business in the area that meets your requirements. Start by looking in the local newspaper’s classified ad section under “Business Opportunities” or “Businesses for Sale.” You can also run your own “Wanted to Buy” ad describing what you are looking for.

Remember, just because a business isn’t listed doesn’t mean it isn’t for sale. Talk to business owners in the industry; many of them might not have their businesses up for sale but would consider selling if you made them an offer. Put your networking abilities and business contacts to use, and you’re likely to hear of other businesses that might be good prospects.

Contacting a business broker is another way to find businesses for sale. Most brokers are hired by sellers to find buyers and help negotiate deals. If you hire a broker, he or she will charge you a commission – typically 5 to 10 percent of the purchase price. The assistance brokers can offer, especially for first-time buyers, is often worth the cost. However, if you are really trying to save money, consider hiring a broker only when you are near the final negotiating phase.

Source: https://positivearticles.com