Tinea and Tinea Capitis Diagnosis and Treatment

Ringworm, also known as “Tinea. Tinea capitis should be considered in all adults with a patchy inflammatory scalp disorder. Tinea capitis is caused by fungi of species of genera Trichophyton and Microsporum. Tinea capitis is the most common pediatric dermatophyte infection worldwide. The age predilection is believed to result from the presence of pityrosporum orbiculare (Pityrosporum ovale), which is part of normal flora, and from the fungistatic properties of fatty acids of short and medium chains in postpubertal sebum. In the United States, T. tonsurans has also become a common cause of tinea capitis; this is passed on from one person to another as it naturally infects humans (i.e. it is anthropophilic). It frequently causes no symptoms and is commonly found in adult carriers.

Tinea capitis is widespread in some urban areas in North America, Central America, and South America. It is common in parts of Africa and India. Symptoms include round, scaly lesions on the scalp. These areas may be red or swollen (inflammed). Itching of the scalp may be slight, or may not occur at all. Sometimes, there may be pus-filled lesions on the scalp (kerions).Tinea capitis is most prevalent between 3 and 7 years of age. It is slightly more common in boys than girls. Infection by T. tonsurans may occur in adults. Tinea capitis requires treatment with an oral antifungal agent. Topical antifungal drugs containing miconazole, clotrimazole, terbinafine, butenafine and tolnaftate, many available without a prescription, are used to clear up the infection.

Selenium sulfide shampoo may reduce the risk of spreading the infection early in the course of therapy by reducing the number of viable spores that are shed. A medicated shampoo, such as one containing selenium sulfide, may reduce the spread of infection. Home Remedies of tea tree oil mixed with an ounce of water. Undecylenic acid (Castor oil derivative) has also been effective for some. Good general hygiene is important in the prevention and treatment of all tinea infections. The scalp should be shampooed regularly, especially after haircuts. Avoid contact with infected pets or individuals. Headgear, combs, and similar items should not be exchanged unless they are first thoroughly cleaned and dried. Wear loose-fitting cotton clothing.

Tinea and Tinea Capitis Treatment Tips

1. Do not share clothing, sports equipment, towels, or sheets.

2. Wear slippers or sandals in locker rooms, showers, and public bathing areas

3. Keep your skin clean and dry. Always dry yourself completely after showers or baths.

4. Wear loose-fitting cotton clothing. Change your socks and underwear at least once a day.

5. Oral steroids may help reduce the risk for and extent of permanent alopecia in the treatment of kerion.

6. Selenium sulfide shampoo may reduce the risk of spreading the infection early in the course of therapy .

7. A medicated shampoo, such as one containing selenium sulfide, may reduce the spread of infection.

8. Headgear, combs, and similar items should not be exchanged unless.