The Benefits of Chamomile

Chamomile can refer to any of several distinct species in the sunflower family. Chamomile has been used throughout the world for infantile colic supported more by word-of-mouth than scientific validation. Chamomile has been used medicinally for thousands of years, and is widely used in Europe. It is a popular treatment for numerous ailments, including sleep disorders, anxiety, digestion/intestinal conditions, skin infections/inflammation , wound healing, infantile colic, teething pains, and diaper rash. In the United States, chamomile is best known as an ingredient in herbal tea preparations advertised for mild sedating effects. Some herbalists also recommend it for treatment of water retention, blood clots, muscle tension, and a depressed immune system. Chamomile is also used internally to treat inflammation and spasms of the digestive tract. As a mouth rinse, it’s used for sore gums and oral inflammation. Chamomile has been used extensively in herbal medicine for many, many, years. Chamomile is frequently an invasive species in agricultural fields. Farmers often must control chamomile’s spread to maintain productivity of their fields.

Chamomile is related to ragweed, and people allergic to ragweed should steer clear of this herb. Chamomile may help ease symptoms of conditions for which modern medicine currently has no cure—inhaling steam containing chamomile extract has been shown to ease cold symptoms. Chamomile helps antibiotics work better when it comes to clearing up bladder infections; another test showed that chamomile was superior to hydrocortisone for easing skin inflammation. It is available in many forms, including capsules, liquid extract, and creams. The usual dosage is two to three 350-milligram capsules or ½ to 1 teaspoon of a liquid extract three times a day. Chamomile “tea” is also thought to be useful to suppress fungal growth, for example misting it over seedlings may prevent damping off. Chamomile is reputed to have anti-spasmodic activity, but there is little research to substantiate this claim. Additional research evaluating chamomile alone is needed.

Chamomile is also used cosmetically, primarily to make a rinse for blonde hair. Chamomile is thought to have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antifungal, and antiseptic powers. However, currently there is no reliable human research available in any of these areas. Additional study is needed. Chamomile contains a wide variety of active constituents, each of which comes to the fore under certain conditions and plays an important supportive role in other situations. Chamomile is as much used as a carminative as a mild sedative. Chamomile has been used extensively in herbal medicine for many, many, years. It has a well-established reputation for healing, and is generally considered to be safe; however, there have been many reports of allergic reactions in people after eating, touching, or inhaling chamomile preparations. Chamomile is related to ragweed, and people allergic to ragweed should steer clear of this herb. Chamomile is used traditionally for numerous gastrointestinal conditions, including digestion disorders, “spasm” or colic, upset stomach, flatulence (gas), ulcers, and gastrointestinal irritation.

Benefits of Chamomile Tips

1. Chamomile has tonic, diaphoretic (causes sweating), and analgesic (pain-relieving) properties.

2. Chamomile is a slightly bitter herb that helps soothe nerves, increase mental awareness, settle the stomach and promote digestion.

3. Chamomile is renowned for its medical and household uses.

4. Chamomile is good for the liver and lungs and helps reduce jaundice, swelling, and ease withdrawal from drugs.

5. Chamomile is as much used as a carminative as a mild sedative.

6. Chamomile is reputed to have anti-spasmodic activity, but there is little research to substantiate this claim.

7. Chamomile spray has not been found to prevent post-operative sore throat and hoarseness any more than normal saline.

8. Chamomile flowers are used in alternative medicine as an anodyne, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, nervine, stomachic, tonic, vasodilatory.