Signs and Symptoms of Raynaud’s Disease

Raynaud’s disease also known raynaud’s phenomenon. Raynaud’s disease is a rare disorder of the blood vessels, usually in the fingers and toes. People with this disorder have attacks that cause the blood vessels to narrow. It is a vasospastic disorder causing discoloration of the fingers, toes, and occasionally other extremities. When the blood flow returns, the skin turns red and throbs or tingles. In severe cases, loss of blood flow can cause sores or tissue death. Cold weather and stress can trigger attacks. Often the cause of Raynaud’s is not known. People in colder climates are more likely to develop Raynaud’s than people in warmer areas.
Raynaud’s disease affects a small percentage of Americans. Women are more likely than men are to have the disorder.

It’s more common in people who live in colder climates. Symptoms include pain in the fingers or toes when exposed to the cold. When the oxygen supply is depleted, the skin colour turns blue (called cyanosis). Toes or fingers that change color upon pressure. At first during an attack of Raynaud’s, affected areas of your skin usually turn white. Then, the areas often turn blue and feel cold and numb, and your sensory perception is dull. The affected skin may look slightly swollen. As circulation improves, the affected areas may turn red, throb, tingle or swell. The order of the changes of color isn’t the same for all people, and not everyone experiences all three colors. Additional symptoms that may be associated with this disease is skin redness or inflammation , bluish skin and paleness.

About 25 percent of people with Raynaud’s have a family history of the condition. In pregnancy, this sign normally disappears due to increased surface blood flow. Rubor (redness) occurs as the blood returns to the affected areas. After an attack is over, throbbing and tingling may occur in the fingers and toes. Cyanosis (blueness) appears because the fingers or toes are not getting enough oxygen rich blood. Other symptoms that occur during cyanosis are feeling cold and numbness. When the blood flow returns, the skin turns red and throbs or tingles. In severe cases, loss of blood flow can cause sores or tissue death. An attack of Raynaud’s is usually triggered by exposure to cold or emotional stress.