Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diadeticorum Treatment Tips

Necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum is a chronic skin disease characterized by shiny plaques that vary in color from light yellowish to reddish-tan. Necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum is a rash which usually occurs on the legs. It is more common in women, and there are usually several spots. They are slightly raised shiny red-brown patches. NLD usually occurs more often in people with diabetes, in people with a family history of diabetes or a tendency to get diabetes. A similar condition that is often confused with NLD is granuloma annulare. Similar to the association of NLD and diabetes, it appears that a high percentage of persons with disseminated granuloma annulare have diabetes mellitus. The individual spots typically consist of a circular array of reddish to brown and slightly translucent bumps.

NL has been reported to occur in all races with no predilection. Necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum is three times more common in women than in men. It is usually located on the shins and starts as erythematous papules over the pretibial areas and may enlarge slowly. It is generally asymptomatic. The lesions are usually well-demarcated, shiny, atrophic, yellowish or red brown, and can be bilateral. Treatment of necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum is difficult. Sometimes NLD responds to topical cortisone preparations; cortisone injections into the lesion can also be used. Ultraviolet light treatment has been found to control this condition when it is flaring. Surgical excision, and split-thickness skin grafting might be advised in some cases.

An antibiotic cream was used on the ulcerated area plus Dermovate bid and moisturizers for dry skin. A baby aspirin each day, and other medications that thin the blood, such as Trental, may help NLD. Other medications, including prednisone pills (steroids) are used in difficult or severe cases. Cortisone injections can also be used to treat necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum. These are more effective than cortisone creams. Protection of the legs with elastic support stockings and leg rest may be helpful. Necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum responds to topical cortisone preparations well sometimes and it can be used. Excision and grafting have been successful, but recurrence may occur secondary to the underlying vascular damage.

Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diadeticorum Treatment Tips

1. Cortisone injections can also be used to treat necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum.

2. Necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum usually goes through stages of activity and inactivity.

3. Ultraviolet light treatment has been found to control this condition when it is flaring.

4. Protection of the legs with elastic support stockings and leg rest may be helpful.

5. Excision and grafting have been successful treatment of necrobiosis lipoidica diadeticorum.