Minimize Skin Scarring

Skin scars occur when the deep, thick layer of skin (the dermis) is damaged. Scars are areas of fibrous tissue that replace normal skin after injury. Scar tissue is not identical to the tissue which it replaces and is usually of inferior functional quality. Scar tissue can form on the skin or on internal wounds. People with conditions like liver cirrhosis, heart disease, and pancreatitis often have scar tissue on their liver, heart or pancreas. A scar is a natural part of the healing process. Larger spots may coalesce to form a broad band of dappling. A scar results from the biologic process of wound repair in the skin and other tissues of the body. Scars can also take the form of stretched skin. Most skin scars are flat, pale and leave a trace of the original injury which caused them. The redness that often follows an injury to the skin is not a scar, and is generally not permanent.

Scars form differently based on the location of the injury on the body and the age of the person who was injured. It has become a problem when old orchards are top worked, and the new is susceptible to the viroid that had been symptomless in the original cultivar. Two types of scars are the result of the body overproducing collagen, which causes the scar to be raised above the surrounding skin. Hypertrophic scars take the form of a red raised lump on the skin, but do not grow beyond the boundaries of the original wound, and they often improve in appearance after a few years. Keloid scars are a more serious form of scarring, because they can carry on growing indefinitely into a large, tumorous (although benign) growth.

Some people, especially those with deeper skin tones, have a tendency to produce prominent raised scars. Scars and stretch marks are generally considered unsightly, disfiguring and unacceptable by many people. No scar can ever be completely removed. Some treatment for scar minimizing scarring including do not wipe fresh wounds with hydrogen peroxide. The bubbles make is feel like something good is happening, but hydrogen peroxide actually destroys new skin cells that immediately begin to grow. Do cover a cut. The old wives tale about allowing a “fresh” cut to breathe will actually not support rapid healing. Do apply constant pressure on a fresh wound with a sterile bandage or silicone sheeting pad. Do not expose new scars to the sun.

Minimize Skin Scarring Tips

1. Do not wipe fresh wounds with hydrogen peroxide.

2. Do cover a cut. The old wives tale about allowing a “fresh” cut to breathe will actually not support rapid healing.

3. Do not fall for the tale about treating with Vitamin E.

4. DO apply constant pressure on a fresh wound with a sterile bandage or silicone sheeting pad.

5. Do not expose new scars to the sun.

6. Do gently massage the scar once the surface is healed.

7. Gentle massage helps breakdown the dense bands of skin.

8. Newer and shallower stretch marks and scars respond better than older and deeper scars and stretch