Mental Stress Treatment

Stress is a psychological and physiological response to events that upset our personal balance in some way. Mental stress is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular events, possibly because of acute increases in endogenous catecholamines. Brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation has been used for noninvasive assessment of macrovascular endothelial function. It is caused by catecholamine-induced increases in heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) that result in enhanced myocardial oxygen demand. Severe stress reactions can result from a catastrophic event or intense experience such as a natural disaster, sexual assault, life-threatening accident, or participation in combat. Recently, brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation has been used for noninvasive assessment of macrovascular endothelial function.

Mental stress can have marked effects on endothelium-dependent, flow-mediated vasodilation in healthy, normal individuals. The effect of mental stress and its associated changes in sympathetic activation on brachial artery endothelium-dependent vasomotor tone. There is no treatment for mental stress is because like physical stress, in mental stress there is no proper symptoms visible in the body. There is no strict rule as to treat a person with mental stress based upon the physical symptoms. While speaking to the person with mental stress, we will be able to understand to some extend the source of the stress and the stressor. Kertesz recommended that treatment programs determine at intake whether clients are chronically homeless.