Hypersomnia Causes Symptoms Information with Treatment

Some patients have recurrent episodes of hypersomnia, which often is associated with compulsive overeating and hypersexuality. This presentation is termed Kleine-Levin syndrome, or KLS. The periods of hypersomnia occur for days to weeks at a time but recur several times a year. Hypersomnia may be caused by another sleep disorder (such as narcolepsy or sleep apnea ), dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system, or drug or alcohol abuse. In some cases it results from a physical problem, such as a tumor, head trauma, or injury to the central nervous system. Certain medications, or medicine withdrawal, may also cause hypersomnia. Medical conditions including multiple sclerosis , depression , encephalitis , epilepsy , or obesity may contribute to the disorder. Some people appear to have a genetic predisposition to hypersomnia; in others, there is no known cause. Hypersomnia typically affects adolescents and young adults, although the most common causes of the condition for the two age cohorts differ. Hypersomnia treatment is symptomatic in nature. Drugs to treat hypersomnia. Stimulants, such as amphetamine, methylphenidate, and modafinil. Other drugs used to treat hypersomnia include clonidine, levodopa, bromocriptine, antidepressants, and monoamine oxidase inhibitors. Changes in behavior (for example avoiding night work and social activities that delay bed time) and diet may offer some relief. Patients should avoid alcohol and caffeine. Tricyclic antidepressants (particularly clomipramine, imipramine and protriptyline) and monoamine oxidase inhibitors are useful in treating sleep paralysis, cataplexy and hypnagogic hallucinations.

Causes of Hypersomnia

Common causes and Risk factors of Hypersomnia

Genetics (heredity).

Brain damage.

Clinical depression.

Uremia and fibromyalgia.

Sleep apnea.

Restless leg syndrome.

Overweight.

Signs and Symptoms of Hypersomnia

Common Sign and Symptoms of Hypersomnia

Long sleep.

Anxiety.

Increased irritation.

Decreased energy.

Restlessness.

Slow speech.

Loss of appetite.

Memory difficulty.

Treatment of Hypersomnia

Common Treatment of Hypersomnia

Hypersomnia treatment is symptomatic in nature. Drugs to treat hypersomnia. Stimulants, such as amphetamine, methylphenidate, and modafinil.

Other drugs used to treat hypersomnia include clonidine, levodopa, bromocriptine, antidepressants, and monoamine oxidase inhibitors.

Changes in behavior (for example avoiding night work and social activities that delay bed time) and diet may offer some relief.

Tricyclic antidepressants (particularly clomipramine, imipramine and protriptyline) and monoamine oxidase inhibitors are useful in treating sleep paralysis, cataplexy and hypnagogic hallucinations.

Go to bed at a set time each night and get up at the same time each morning.

Try to exercise 20 to 30 minutes a day. Daily exercise often helps people sleep, although a workout soon before bedtime may interfere with sleep.

Patients should avoid alcohol and caffeine.

Good sleep habits.