How To Fight Against Wrinkles

Wrinkle is a ridge or crease of a surface. Wind, heat and chemicals and the natural effects of aging cause a certain amount of wrinkling in everyone. Most wrinkles are associated with aging changes in skin. Aging of the skin and related structures (hair and nails) is a natural process. It usually refers to folds on fabric or clothes, or on the skin of an organism; the folds are generally random and do not exhibit any repeating pattern. Skin wrinkles typically appear as a result of aging processes such as glycation or, temporarily, as the result of prolonged (more than a few minutes) immersion in water. Wrinkling in skin is caused by habitual facial expressions, aging, sun damage, smoking, poor hydration, and various other factors. In addition, as a person ages, the sweat and oil glands of the skin become less numerous and smaller in size. This causes the skin to lose moisture and to dry out. Dry skin with weak collagen and elastin will sag, shrivel, and wrinkle.

Wrinkles are a by-product of the aging process. With age, skin cells divide more slowly, and the inner layer, called the dermis, begins to thin. Most wrinkles appear on the parts of the body where sun exposure is greatest. These especially include the face, neck, the backs of the hands, and the tops of the forearms. Wrinkles come in two categories: fine surface lines and deep furrows. The skin around the eyelids, jaw, and neck is especially thin, and therefore more naturally prone to aging. Although people may have a genetic predisposition to severe wrinkling, it is known that sun exposure promotes and exacerbates wrinkling of the skin. Smoking may also negatively affect the skin. The most critical step in the treatment of wrinkles is sun avoidance and sunscreen use. Lasers may also be used to minimize wrinkles. Non-ablative (or “lunchtime”) lasers do not break the skin and have minimal side effects, but, are also not very effective. Other lasers, known as non-ablative lasers, may also be beneficial in treating wrinkles. These lasers work by heating the dermis and stimulating collagen growth.

Treatments and products (including anti-aging creams) promising to reduce, remove, or prevent age-related wrinkles are big business in many industrialized countries. Botox collagen and other injections are the addional techniques available to help minimize wrinkles. Vitamin A Acid (tretinoin, Retin-A, Renova). This ingredient, available by prescription, has the longest track record of success in treating aging skin and fine lines. Dermabrasion (scraping layers away) and chemical peels (dissolving skin away) are two of the traditional methods used in skin resurfacing. Heat and radiofrequency. Another variation of noninvasive facial rejuvenation is to heat tissue using radiofrequency devises and infrared light sources. Techniques are still being developed, but results to date suggest that such treatments are safe and can produce visible and lasting improvement, though not as much as surgical techniques like facelifts. Fillers are injected into the skin to increase volume and flatten wrinkles and folds. For a long time, the most popular filler was collagen, whose effect only lasts a few months.

Wrinkles Treatment Tips

1. Never use a sunlamp or tanning bed or lie in the sun to get a tan.

2. Wear a sunscreen on your face and hands every day. Many companies make daily moisturizing creams that also contain sunscreen.

3. When exposure to the sun cannot be avoided, wear a wide-brimmed hat, sunglasses, and tightly-woven clothing.

4. About 30 minutes before you go out in the sun, apply a sunscreen with a sun-protection factor (SPF) of at least 15.

5. Reapply sunscreen after swimming, perspiring heavily, or toweling off.

6. Never use a sunlamp or tanning bed or lie in the sun to get a tan.

7. Wear a sunscreen on your face and hands every day.

8. Reapply sunscreen after swimming, perspiring heavily, or toweling off.