Dyssomnia Causes Symptoms Information with Treatment

Dyssomnia NOS (not otherwise specified) refers to any insomnia, hypersomnia, or circadian rhythm disturbance that does not meet the full criteria for a specific dyssomnia. There are over 30 recognized kinds of dyssomnias. Common Causes of Dyssomnia is medications or illicit “street drugs” (for example, excessive thyroid replacement hormone, amphetamines, caffeine-containing beverages, cocaine, ephedrine, phenylpropanolamine, theophylline derivatives). Interference with sleep by various diseases, including an enlarged prostate (men), cystitis (women), COPD, pain of arthritis, heartburn, and heart or lung problems. Alcoholism or abrupt cessation of alcohol after long-term use. Excessive physical or intellectual stimulation at bedtime. Wake-sleep pattern disturbances and anxiety or stress and depression. In general, there are two broad classes of treatment, and the two may be combined: psychological (cognitive-behavioral) and pharmacologic. In situations of acute distress, such as a grief reaction, pharmacologic measures may be most appropriate. Drug treatment should only be resorted to a as a last option. Practice good sleep hygiene: avoid using alcohol in the evening and to avoid caffeine before bedtime.

Causes of Dyssomnia

Common Causes and Risk factors of Dyssomnia

Wake-sleep pattern disturbances.

Depression or major depression.

Anxiety or stress.

Exhilaration or excitement.

Bed or bedroom not conducive to sleep.

Nicotine, alcohol, caffeine, food, or stimulants at bedtime.

Overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism).

Stress.

Signs and Symptoms of Dyssomnia

Sign and symptoms of Dyssomnia

Sleeplessness.

Wakefulness.

Treatment for Dyssomnia

Common Treatment for Dyssomnia

Two broad classes of treatment, and the two may be combined: psychological (cognitive-behavioral) and pharmacologic.

Practice good sleep hygiene.

Avoid using alcohol in the evening.

Drug treatment should only be resorted to a as a last option.

Avoid caffeine before bedtime.

Relax by reading, taking a bath, or listening to soothing music before getting to bed.

Antidepressants can often help both the sleeping problem and the depression usually associated with the disorder.