Borderline Personality Disorder Causes Symptoms Information with Treatment

Borderline personality disorder (BPD is a common disorder with estimates running as high as 10-14% of the general population. Social factors in BPD reflect many of the problems of modern society. Borderline personality disorder affects approximately 2% of the general population. About 75% of those diagnosed with borderline personality disorder are females. Treatment includes psychotherapy which allows the patient to talk about both present difficulties and past experiences in the presence of an empathetic, accepting and non-judgemental therapist. Sometimes medications such as antidepressants, lithium carbonate, or antipsychotic medication are useful for certain patients or during certain times in the treatment of individual patients. Brief hospitalization may sometimes be necessary during acutely stressful episodes or if suicide or other self-destructive behavior threatens to erupt. The goals of treatment could include increased self-awareness with greater impulse control and increased stability of relationships. A positive result would be in one’s increased tolerance of anxiety. Therapy should help to alleviate psychotic or mood-disturbance symptoms and generally integrate the whole personality.

Causes of Borderline Personality Disorder

Common Causes and Risk factors of Borderline Personality Disorder

Genetics.

Environmental factors.

Brain abnormalities.

Social factors

Signs and Symptoms of Borderline Personality Disorder

Sign and Symptoms of Borderline Personality Disorder

Impulsivity in at least two areas that are potentially self-damaging .

Recurrent suicidal behavior, gestures, or threats, or self-mutilating behavior.

Affective instability due to a marked reactivity of mood.

Chronic feelings of emptiness.

Fear of being alone.

Difficulty controlling emotions or impulses.

Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder

Common Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder

Treatment includes psychotherapy which allows the patient to talk about both present difficulties and past experiences in the presence of an empathetic, accepting and non-judgemental therapist.

Sometimes medications such as antidepressants, lithium carbonate, or antipsychotic medication are useful for certain patients or during certain times in the treatment of individual patients.

Brief hospitalization may sometimes be necessary during acutely stressful episodes or if suicide or other self-destructive behavior threatens to erupt. Hospitalization may provide a a temporary removal from external stress.

Outpatient treatment is usually difficult and long-term – sometimes over a number of years. Therapy should help to alleviate psychotic or mood-disturbance symptoms and generally integrate the whole personality.